Weekend full moon one worth howling at

The waxing gibbous moon will reach it’s fullness Saturday as winter takes us full in its grip and wolves howl hungry in the forest.

The full moon sets among the pine trees alongside the Beeline Highway Thursday morning July 2, 2015 . This is the first of two full moons this month; the next one is July 31. (Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post)

The full moon sets among the pine trees alongside the Beeline Highway Thursday morning July 2, 2015 . This is the first of two full moons this month; the next one is July 31. (Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post)

January’s full moon was named the wolf by Native American tribes that could hear hungry wolves howling outside their villages, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac.

For the U.S. the wolf moon will reach the pinnacle of its full phase Saturday at about 9 p.m. EST.

This moon is the second since the December solstice. It is also called the snow moon, or hunger moon.

But while the wolf moon may have its roots in Native American history, it is inexplicably tied with folklore and storytelling from around the world.

After all, it is upon the full moon that those unlucky souls who have befallen a werewolf bite will then turn into a werewolf themselves.

Singer, songwriter Cat Stevens believes you can be followed by a moon shadow.

Also, there’s the myth that a full moon can cause lunacy, and that blue moons are actually blue. Blue moons are really the fourth full moon to occur in a season.

Creedence Clearwater Revival thinks moons can be evil and good.

EarthSky.org reports that January’s full moon will follow a high path across the sky and rise north of due east around sunset. It will be highest in the sky around midnight and set north of due west around sunrise.

 

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