Tropical Storm Lisa forms in the Atlantic, first “L” storm since 2013

Update 5 p.m.: Tropical Storm Lisa has strengthened slightly as it moves over the open Atlantic.

The storm, which formed this morning, now has 45 mph winds and is moving northwest at about 12 mph.

Lisa’s top wind speeds are expected to max out at 60 mph in the next 48 hours before weakening. It is not expected to become a hurricane or impact land.

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At 10:45 a.m. EDT on Sept. 20 NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured a visible picture of the newly christened tropical storm. A wide band of thunderstorms were feeding into Lisa’s center from the east and southeastern quadrants. Credits: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Tropical Storm Karl, which is expected to become a Category 2 hurricane over the weekend, was being investigated by a NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft as of the 5 p.m. advisory.

The storm is about 480 miles east-northeast of the Leeward Islands with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph.

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While Karl may take a swipe at Bermuda, it is not expected to make a landfall along the U.S. coast. Some forecasters are warning of high surf and rip currents along some Atlantic beaches this weekend, but the National Weather Service in Miami said it’s too early to tell for Palm Beach County.

Tropical storm force winds extend out 140 miles from Karl’s center.

Dan Kottlowski, a hurricane expert with AccuWeather, said there isn’t much brewing behind Karl and Lisa.

“By Sunday or Monday, we may have no organized tropical features across the Atlantic basin whatsoever,” Kottlowski said. “A week from toay, I would not be totally shocked if that is the case.”

Update 11 a.m.: Tropical Storm Lisa has formed in the far off Atlantic.

According to the 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, Lisa was a weak tropical storm with just 40 mph winds. The system, the 12th-named storm of the year, is the first “L”-named storm since 2013.

The 2015 storm season ended with the late-season storm Hurricane Kate, which became a hurricane Nov. 9.

Lisa is expected to strengthen to 60 mph winds through Thursday before weakening. It is not expected to become a hurricane and its current 5-day forecast track indicates that it is no threat to land.

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Tropical Storm Karl remains a 40 mph cyclone, but is still expected to become a Category 2 hurricane by Saturday with 105 mph winds.

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Karl could gain hurricane strength over the next three days as it heads west at 17 mph. While Karl is no threat to the U.S., it’s track does take it over Bermuda when it hangs a sharp right on Friday.

Tropical storm force winds extend out 140 miles from Karl’s center.

Karl is expected to stir up surf along the east coast later this week, which may mean increased risk of rip currents.

While the strongest storms have been steered away from the coast so far this season, Florida is still in the peak of it’s hurricane season and October is climatologically the busiest time of the year for the Sunshine State.

Previous story: A depression that formed in the Atlantic on Monday is expected to become Tropical Storm Lisa today, the 12th named storm of the year and the first “L” storm since 2013.

Tropical deppession 13 satellite imagery as of 5 a.m. Sept. 20, 2016

Tropical deppession 13 satellite imagery as of 5 a.m. Sept. 20, 2016

As of the 5 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, the depression was about 390 miles west-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands with maximum sustained wind speeds of 35 mph and a minimum central pressure of 1007 mb.

Follow storm tracks on The Palm Beach Post’s tracking map. 

The system is no threat to land at this point and is not expected to become a hurricane within the five-day track forecast.

Still, it’s notable in that if Lisa forms, it will mark the busiest season since 2013, when the season had 13 named storms.

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Tropical Storm Karl, which as of 5 a.m. was 625 miles east-northeast of the Leeward Islands, had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph and was heading west-northwest at 290 degrees.

Although no threat to land at this point, Karl is expected to form into a Category 2 hurricane with 105 mph winds and take a swipe at Bermuda before heading out into the Atlantic.

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

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The storm is expected to gain hurricane status by Friday. making it the 5th hurricane this year since Alex formed in January.

The long-term average is for six hurricanes to occur per year and forecasters have been predicting a near normal to slightly busier than normal Atlantic hurricane season.

But with La Nina a no-show this hurricane season so far, storms are fighting westerly wind shear and dry air, despite having amply warm waters for formation.

Still, the U.S. has felt the impacts of recently passed Julia and is expected to being seeing Karl’s ripple effect during the coming weekend with stirred up surf along the Atlantic beaches.

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“The danger of rough surf and rip currents would endanger residents and late-season vacationers hoping to take advantage of the still warm water temperatures. Following Julia,” wrote AccuWeather forecaster  Kristina Pydinowski. “It would mark the second weekend in a row of a tropical system stirring up seas at the Southeast beaches.”

Tropical Storm Karl as of the 5 a.m. advisory on Sept. 20, 2016

Tropical Storm Karl as of the 5 a.m. advisory on Sept. 20, 2016

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