Worst of weather moving offshore, but storms, rain continue overnight

Update 4:30 p.m.: The worst of the thunderstorms are moving offshore, but National Weather Service forecasters said more storms are possible overnight as a cool front continues to wash through South Florida.

Radar valid as of 4:30 p.m.

The slow-moving front won’t make it into the Florida Straits until Wednesday morning, with showers and thunderstorms possible in Palm Beach County through at least 2 p.m. Wednesday.

Cold front location as of 8 p.m. tonight.

The heaviest rainfall so far has been in South Palm Beach County, where water management district gauges estimate a maximum of 2.4 inches fell near the Hillsboro Canal.

Rainfall estimates valid as of 5 p.m. for previous 6 hours from the South Florida Water Management District.

While an earlier report of a tornado in Fort Lauderdale is now suspect because of a lack of damage, the NWS warning coordination meteorologist in Miami said a trained spotter reported a tornado at 4:30 p.m. just north of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

A wind gust of 63 mph was recorded by a WeatherBug station at Port Everglades, according to the NWS. There have also been reports of dime to penny size hail in Davie and Plantation.

Temperatures in West Palm Beach plummeted 19 degrees between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. as the storms rolled through. A wind gust of 38 mph was recorded at Palm Beach International Airport between 3 and 4 p.m.

Wednesday’s forecast includes a 20 percent chance of showers before clearing Thursday. Tuesday’s high temperature topped off at 88 degrees in West Palm Beach.

West Palm Beach

Update 4 p.m.:  The National Weather Service has issued a significant weather advisory for coastal Palm Beach County until 4:30 p.m.

Frequent lightning, heavy rain and gusty winds are occurring with this storm.

Wait for a half hour after thunder ceases before going outside. Lightning can strike from 15 miles away.

About 3,400 FPL customers in Palm Beach County without electricity.

Image of approaching storms taken at Jupiter Inlet. Courtesy Tom Knapp

A tornado has been confirmed in Fort Lauderdale.

Update 3:45 p.m.: A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for east-central Palm Beach County.

The warning is in effect until 4:15 p.m.

A tornado has been confirmed by a weather spotter in Fort Lauderdale, with hail falling in Oakland Park.

While forecasters said the storm over Fort Lauderdale has weakened, there is still an active sea breeze in Broward and Miami-Dade counties that could continue to produce severe storms.

Update 3:30 p.m.: Strong thunderstorms near Wellington are moving east at 20 mph and could include small hail.

A significant weather advisory is in effect until 4:30 p.m. for areas including West Palm Beach, Delray Beach, Boca Raton and Boynton Beach.

Check The Palm Beach Post’s live weather radar. 

Concerns with these storms also include wind gusts of up to 55 mph that can down small tree limbs and branches.

A tornado warning is in effect for areas near downtown Fort Lauderdale until 4 p.m.

Update 3 p.m.: A significant weather advisory has been issued for inland and metro areas of Palm Beach County as a strong line of thunderstorms moves into the area with wind gusts up to 55 mph possible.

The advisory is in effect until 4 p.m.

The thunderstorm was 11 miles northwest of Lion Country Safari, moving east at 60 mph towards West Palm Beach.

Update 2:30 p.m.: Palm Beach County is between an advancing cold front nearing Lake Okeechobee and sea breeze storms moving northeast through Broward County.

The National Weather Service in Miami has a marine warning for Lake Okeechobee and a special weather advisory for Broward County alerting to possible wind gusts to 50 mph and small hail.

Coastal Palm Beach County is where storms are expected to be the most robust late afternoon into evening, with isolated 1-inch hail, wind gusts to 60 mph and heavy rain.

The cold front dropped hail in North Florida as big as “teacups”, according to the NWS in Jacksonville. Smaller hail was seen in St. Augustine.

 

Previous story: The risk for thunderstorms and damaging winds was increased to a marginal threat today as ingredients come together for afternoon showers and a cold front pushes through the state overnight.

Near-record highs today that could reach 89 degrees in West Palm Beach, combined with moist air and sea breezes may erupt into afternoon thunderstorms, according to the National Weather Service in Miami.

Overnight, a cold front that is dropping hail in Jacksonville this morning, could mean more thunderstorm activity for South Florida into Wednesday morning.

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A marginal threat for severe weather stretches into Palm Beach County today into overnight.

Forecasters expect showers and thunderstorms to be focused over the eastern portions of the South Florida as southwesterly winds will keep the east coast sea breeze pinned closer to the coast.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

The Storm Prediction Center prediction center’s marginal risk for severe weather means gusty winds, heavy rain, lightning, and hail cannot be ruled out with the stronger storms today.

Today’s forecast high temperature in West Palm Beach of 89 is just one degree shy of the record 90 degrees set in 1956.

A small craft advisory is in effect from 5 a.m. Wednesday to 2 a.m. Friday as winds shift out of the north up to 25 knots and seas expected to reach as high as 8 feet in offshore waters.

This forecast map shows the cold front over Palm Beach County at 2 a.m. Wednesday.

 The National Weather Service in Jacksonville is reporting “teacup” size hail in areas of St. Johns County, and have issued a flood warning for Alachua, Flagler, Marion and Putnam counties.

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BREAKING: Part of Palm Beach County at risk for severe weather today

The Storm Prediction Center has put the northern half of Palm Beach County in its marginal risk level for severe weather this afternoon.

Forecasters said the biggest concern is with strong downdrafts that could produce damaging winds and heavy rain.

The National Weather Service said thunderstorms should be focused more toward interior areas of the county with “one or two” becoming severe.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

Storm Prediction Center

UPDATE: Severe weather threat ends, more rain expected at daybreak

Update 10:30 p.m.: Occasional showers and storms will linger overnight, with more activity expected toward daybreak, according to the National Weather Service in Miami.

A thunderstorm quickly passes over Bingham Island in Palm beach Wednesday evening near West Palm Beach May 24, 2017. (Meghan McCarthy / The Palm Beach Post)
A thunderstorm moves offshore Wednesday evening near Palm Beach May 24, 2017. (Meghan McCarthy / The Palm Beach Post)

Update 9:30 p.m.: The severe thunderstorm watch for Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties has been cancelled.

While the storms moved through more quickly than first forecast, people were still able to get some amazing images. 

South Palm Beach County received the most rain as of 9:30 p.m. with about 1.84 inches near Boca Raton.

Showers are expected to continue off and on overnight, but severe weather is not predicted.

Update 9 p.m.: A severe thunderstorm warning has been cancelled as storms moved offshore, but a marine warning remains in effect until 9 p.m.

The marine warning stretches from Jupiter south through Miami-Dade County.

Update 8:19 p.m.: A severe thunderstorm warning has been issued for southeastern Palm Beach County.

Hazards include possible wind gusts of up to 60 mph.

Thunderstorms are located along the Broward County and Palm Beach County line and have intensified with winds up to 63 mph as indicated by radar.

The warning is in effect until 8:45 p.m.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

National Weather Service meteorologists in Miami said the pre-frontal squall line accelerated this afternoon and is currently moving across the east coast metro areas.

It was originally not expected to move through until late tonight into Thursday morning.

The line of thunderstorms is now expected to be through the area within the next 1 to 2 hours with scattered to isolated storms behind it then a lull in activity overnight.

Update 8:02 p.m. A thunderstorm watch remains in effect for Palm Beach County as a squall line continues through South Florida ahead of a cool front.

A 61-mph wind gust was recorded in Broward County near Cypress Bay High School. Winds are gusting to more than 30 mph at Palm Beach International Airport with sustained southwest winds of 23 mph.

Update 7:35 p.m.: A thunderstorm off Palm Beach County’s coast is capable of producing waterspouts, according to a marine warning issued by the National Weather Service.

The warning is in effect until 8 p.m.

Update 7:15 p.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a significant weather advisory for Palm Beach County with forecasters tracking a line of thunderstorms with possible rotation.

Arlena Moses, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Miami, said any storms this evening have the possibility of producing up to 60 mph wind gusts, frequent lightning, small hail and heavy rain.

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Isolated tornadoes cannot be ruled out.

“There now looks to be a lull in activity and diminishing severe potential behind the squall line overnight, though a few showers and storms still remain possible,” she said.

Update 6:16 p.m.: Thunderstorms moving northeast at 40 mph across the eastern half of South Florida has triggered a significant weather advisory for Palm Beach County until 7 p.m.

These showers and storms are ahead of the main squall line that is forecast to hit southeast Florida later tonight, possibly after midnight.

National Weather Service forecasters said the storms are increasing in intensity as they approach the coast.

Update 6:04 p.m.: A thunderstorm wind gust of 55 mph was recorded near the Naples Grande Beach resort as a cool front approaches southeast Florida.

About 10 reports of damaging winds and one weak tornado have so far been reported with the squall line in Florida. The tornado was near Jacksonville and began as a waterspout. No damage was initially reported.

Update 4:57 p.m.: The National Weather Service has expanded its significant weather advisory for up to 55 mph winds to include all of Palm Beach County.

Meteorologists are tracking multiple showers and strong thunderstorms across interior sections of South Florida that are moving northeast at 50 mph.

The advisory is in effect until 6:15 p.m.

Update 4:38 p.m.: A significant weather advisory has been issued for northeastern Palm Beach County as a strong thunderstorm moves in from Palm Beach Gardens.

The storm is moving northeast at 50 mph and could bring winds up to 55 mph.

The advisory is in effect until 5 p.m.

Update 4:15 p.m.: A lower risk of severe weather is now forecast for areas of North and Central Florida, which had been in the “enhanced” category of risk.

That leaves the Treasure Coast and Palm Beach County in the “slight” threat level, which includes a low risk of tornadoes, but moderate risk of damaging winds, hail and thunderstorms.

The Storm Prediction Center reduced the threat levels after widespread cloud cover and sporadic rain helped stabilize that atmosphere.

Its still unclear if today’s cloud cover in South Florida will do the same. The temperature in West Palm Beach reached 93 degrees with south winds gusting to 30 mph at Palm Beach International Airport.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

The timing for the most severe storms in Palm Beach County is still late night, possibly after midnight, into early Thursday morning.

A thunderstorm warning is in effect until 11 p.m.

A special marine warning is in effect until 4:45 p.m. for Lake Okeechobee as a strong thunderstorm approaches from the southwest.

Update 2:49 p.m.: The Storm Prediction Center has issued a severe thunderstorm watch for much of Florida’s peninsula including Palm Beach County.

The watch is in effect until 11 p.m.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

Bill Bunting, chief of forecast operations for the Storm Prediction Center, said the most severe storms are not expected to reach Palm Beach County until 11 p.m. or after midnight and could continue through early Thursday.

“It’s definitely a night to watch the weather,” he said.

A thunderstorm watch means atmospheric conditions are favorable for the formation of severe storms that could carry hail, damaging winds and lightning.

A thunderstorm warning means a storm has developed and shelter should be found.

Update 1 p.m.: A heightened threat for severe weather has been increased to include all of Palm Beach County as storms erupt ahead of a cold front moving through the state.

A slight risk of severe weather – the second threat level on a 5-tier scale from the Storm Prediction Center – means there is a moderate chance of damaging 60-mph winds or greater, up to quarter-size hail, and a low threat of isolated tornadoes.

As of 2:30, the storms were moving through the Tampa Bay area and Jacksonville. The Manatee County Sheriff said the Sunshine Skyway Bridge is temporarily closed because of high winds.

While scattered thunderstorms may pop up this afternoon, meteorologists are more concerned about the squall line preceding the cool front.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

Those storms are not expected to reach Palm Beach County until late tonight, possibly after midnight, and last through early Thursday morning.

“Overnight tonight, you will want to make sure you get any warnings that may be issued for your area on your phone or have your NOAA weather radio on,” said Larry Kelly, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Miami. “We’ll be keeping the public updated as best we can.”

Update 9 a.m.: The Storm Prediction Center has upgraded today’s severe storm threat for Central and North Florida while keeping a slight risk for Palm Beach County.

The enhanced risk for areas from Jacksonville through Orlando means numerous severe storms are possible with higher chances of tornadoes and damaging hail.

In Palm Beach County, a slight threat risk remains beginning late evening through overnight with scattered to severe storms possible, “one or two” tornadoes and isolated hail.

Previous story: Forecasters have pushed back the timing for today’s potential severe weather for southeast Florida to late evening lingering into Thursday morning.

A squall line of thunderstorms is expected to approach the southwest coast and Lake Okeechobee late evening before midnight, reaching Palm Beach County overnight and lasting through early Thursday.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

“Any storm that becomes severe may produce damaging winds,” National Weather Service forecasters said this morning. “Large hail is also possible, and an isolated tornado or two can’t be ruled out.”

Some showers may stir up this afternoon in southeast Florida ahead of the strongest storms tonight.

Rain and showers are forecast to linger through Thursday, according to the National Weather Service in Miami.

The Storm Prediction Center has areas of North Palm Beach County to suburban Boca Raton at a slight risk for severe weather today, with West Palm Beach and cities to the south at a marginal risk.

That means a moderate threat for wind gusts in excess of 60 mph, and downed trees and power lines with isolated pockets of more extensive damage possible. Locally heavy rainfall could lead to some isolated street flooding.

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

“It’s going to be pretty heavy and gusty once it fires up,” said Dave Samuhel, senior meteorologist at AccuWeather. “We can’t rule out a tornado, but the bigger threat is straight-line damaging winds.”

The Storm Prediction Center has 17.8 million people from Charleston, S.C., into South Florida under a slight risk for severe weather — the second level on a five-tier threat scale. The highest risk areas in Palm Beach County include Jupiter west to Lake Okeechobee and south to suburban Boca Raton.

Radar loop as of 5:45 a.m.

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Photos: Amazing images from Wednesday’s storms

A line of thunderstorms preceding a cold front  moved through more quickly than forecasters thought, but people were still able to get some amazing images from today’s weather.

https://twitter.com/SavanahResnik/status/867519292736188416

A thunderstorm moves offshore Wednesday evening near Palm Beach May 24, 2017. (Meghan McCarthy / The Palm Beach Post)

Update: Wednesday will be a scorcher ahead of severe weather threat

The National Weather Service is forecasting temperatures near 90 and afternoon storms in West Palm Beach today, but things heat up even more Wednesday ahead of an unusually late cool front.

Wednesday’s daytime high could be a scorching 94 degrees.

That’s abnormal even for August in South Florida and a full seven degrees above what’s normal for May 24. The record high temperature for the day is 96 degrees set in 1917.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

The late May cool front, which is likely the last of the year, will be switching the winds to the south-southwest on Wednesday, sucking up deep tropical moisture and turning up the heat.

Parts of Palm Beach County from Jupiter southwest to suburban Boca Raton, and including west to Lake Okeechobee, are under a slight threat of severe weather. That means a moderate threat of damaging winds 60 mph or greater, hail up to quarter size and isolated tornadoes.

While the exact timing of the turbulent weather is dependent on how swiftly the front advances, meteorologists were forecasting Wednesday afternoon into Thursday as its likely window of opportunity.

“This is more than the normal Florida thunderstorm,” said Kenneth Clark, an expert meteorologist with AccuWeather. “It’s out of the ordinary kind of stuff because it’s late for something to get this far south.”

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

And it has an extra spark — a screaming jet stream running at 150 mph over Florida is forecast to smack into deep tropical moisture flowing in from the south-southwest. That warm, buoyant air rising quickly into cold air aloft can cause combustion in the form of thunderstorms.

It also has the making for hail if thunderstorm updrafts are strong enough to suspend raindrops in the upper atmosphere long enough to freeze.

“It’s probably the last front of the year of this magnitude,” said Tim Sedlock, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Melbourne. “It has some upper-air support and that’s somewhat unusual for this time of year. We’ll also have deeper moisture across the area with higher precipitation rates.”

Rain chances Wednesday are 40 percent increasing to 70 percent in the evening.

The Weather Prediction Center has southeast Florida getting between 0.50 inches and 1.25 inches of rain Wednesday into Thursday. But meteorologists don’t believe flooding will be a problem because the ground is so dry.

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Update: Vero Beach hits record 91, Melbourne 92 before Friday cool down

Temperatures are forecast to plummet into the 50s Friday morning after July-like days Wednesday and Thursday.

The National Weather Service in Miami forecast 89 degrees for Palm Beach International Airport before the Friday cool-down.

The weather will be only slightly cooler for coastal Palm Beach, which is expected to see highs of 86 Wednesday and Thursday as a breezy south wind pulls moist tropical air into South Florida.

On Tuesday, an overnight heat record was tied in Fort Lauderdale when temperatures dipped to just 76 degrees. In West Palm Beach, the morning low Tuesday dipped to 73 degrees. That’s nine degrees above normal, but not a record-breaker.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

“Right now, we’re not forecasting anything for Palm Beach to be broken,” said NWS meteorologist Larry Kelly about record highs and lows. “But that can always change depending on the timing of the front.”

A low pressure system expected to incite severe weather in the southeast Wednesday will begin to shift winds to the southwest throughout the day Thursday as its counter-clockwise swirl lifts northeast through the Ohio Valley.

While Thursday is again expected to be 5 to 10 degrees above normal for this time of year, it will begin to cool down after the front passes with lows overnight Thursday dipping to the low 60s in Palm Beach and 50s inland.

Satellite image of building severe weather in the southeast ahead of cold front expected to move through South Florida on Thursday.

The normal high temperature for early April is 80 degrees, with a normal overnight low of 65 degrees.

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

“On Thursday, the front will push through South Florida, which will enhance a few showers and storms during the day,” forecasters wrote in a discussion Wednesday. “East coast urban areas should see Thursday as the warmest day, when southwesterly winds could boos temperatures a few degrees before the cold front crosses.”

This map shows the front approaching South Florida at 8 a.m. Thursday. Rain chances pick up after 1 p.m.

Winds will shift to the northwest Thursday afternoon and continue into Friday, pulling down cold northern air, which is a mix of Rocky Mountain coolness and Canadian chill.

President Donald Trump may arrive Thursday at the same time as the showers ahead of the cold front.  Trump is scheduled to arrive at Palm Beach International Airport sometime after 2 p.m., when a FAA temporary flight restriction goes into effect.

That’s also when rain chances jump to near 50 percent and the strongest winds will be gusting to  more than 20 mph.

But the rain is expected to make a quick entrance and exit, with “abundant” dry air behind it that will linger through the weekend.

Trump, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, should have a pleasant weekend with low relative humidity and high temperatures Saturday and Sunday in the low 70s.

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Breaking: Strongest front of season could bring severe weather to Florida

Update 7:50 a.m. Friday: See most recent weather story about increased potential for severe storms Sunday. 

Previous story: The Storm Prediction Center is forecasting some severe weather for most of Florida on Sunday into Monday as a potent cold front pushes through the state.

While just a northwest sliver of Palm Beach County is currently in a zone of where there is a 15 percent chance of strong to severe thunderstorms, the system is worth keeping an eye on through the weekend.

Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Miami said the front is expected to be the strongest of the season with gusty widespread showers and storms.

Related: It snowed in Palm Beach County 40 years ago today

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The cold front is not expected to produce a deep drop in temperatures, but a raging jet stream high in the atmosphere will dip down low enough to create a combustible atmosphere over Florida.

“In terms of severe weather, we haven’t had this kind of threat yet this season,” said Miami-based NWS meteorologist Andrew Hagen. “This is the most significant potential we’ve had in several months.”

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

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Storm Prediction Center map shows most of Florida with either a 15 to 30 percent chance Sunday into Monday for severe weather.

Clear skies should remain through Saturday, but by Sunday, rain and wind will increase to sustained speeds of 29 mph.

Monday includes a 40 percent chance of showers with sustained winds of 25 mph and gusts to 33 mph.

Hagen said one of the biggest concerns is for coastal waters where seas could reach higher than 15 feet.

“We are going to have really rough seas Sunday and Monday,” he said. “The coldest morning will be Tuesday, but we don’t have any 40s forecast in our area, just down into the 50s in interior regions.”

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

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A forecast map for Sunday shows the strong cold front approaching Florida. The system is expected to be through the state by late Monday.

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Marine warning issued for Lake Okeechobee

Update 2:46 p.m.: A marine warning has been issued for Lake Okeechobee by the National Weather Service.

Forecasters said they are tracking a strong thunderstorm near Pahokee that is moving west at 15 knots.

Wind gusts up to 46 mph and small hail are possible with this storm.

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Previous story: The National Weather Service has issued a significant weather advisory for areas including Wellington, Royal Palm Beach and West Palm Beach.

According to the advisory, thunderstorms capable of producing nickel-size hail, are moving slowly west in a line extending from Royal Palm Beach to Loxahatchee.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

The advisory is in effect until 2 p.m.

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Earlier, the Storm Prediction Center had issued a marginal risk of severe weather for South Florida today, noting cooler temperatures high in the atmosphere may spur robust thunderstorms.

National Weather Service forecasters in Miami said storms are expected to develop in the late morning to early afternoon along the coast, shifting to the interior and to the west coast through late afternoon early evening.

Concerns include nickel-size hail and wind gusts of up to 55 mph that could damage awnings, car ports, trees, and toss around light objects, such as lawn furniture.

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

A marginal risk is the lowest level on the center’s severe weather scale.

Temperatures at 18,000 feet are expected to reach a frigid 17 degrees this afternoon as a upper-level system moves the northeast Gulf of Mexico. That is expected to clash with the high pressure system that has been hanging over the southeast during the past week.

Miami forecasters have increased rain chances to 50 percent along the coast and 70 percent inland.

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Severe weather possible this week with thunderstorms, small hail

Powerful thunderstorms and near record-high temperatures are forecast through Wednesday as the sprawling tail of a cold front whips into South Florida.

Small hail, wind gusts up to 60 mph and frequent lightning are the main concerns with the forecast, which puts Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast in the marginal threat level for severe weather Tuesday and Wednesday.

While marginal is the lowest level on a five-tier scale, increasing moisture, and a dip in the jet stream that places South Florida under the swift-moving current of air, could make for potentially volatile storms.

Top lightning myths debunked.

“With the warm humid air building, all we need is for the cold air aloft and strong winds aloft to interact with that to cause severe weather,” said Dan Kottlowski, a senior meteorologist with the Pennsylvania-based AccuWeather. “That’s why we believe that Florida is looking to be primed for that potential.”

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The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., gave South Florida a 5 percent chance of severe weather as of Monday.

Tuesday’s temperature could hit 90-degrees, just one degree shy of the record set in 1986. Expected cloud cover could limit Wednesday’s high to 87 degrees.

Afternoon sea breezes are the expected trigger for Tuesday’s storms, which are forecast to mostly hug parts of the coast.

By Wednesday afternoon, the cold front associated with a low pressure system centered over the mid-Atlantic states will swing into South Florida. Speedy winds high in the atmosphere coupled with temperatures of just 14 degrees near 18,000 feet could mean robust updrafts, which are the makers of hail and lightning.

“We’ll assess as we go,” said Robert Molleda, warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Miami. “Wind and hail appear to be the two biggest threats, but we can’t rule out anything else.”

The cold front will bring in drier air and force temperatures down a little. Thursday’s high is expected to reach 83 degrees, which is about normal for this time of year. Friday’s daytime temperature will climb only to 80 degrees, four degrees shy of normal.

Some rain will likely be welcomed by parts of parched Palm Beach County, which ended April below normal for rainfall.

An average of just one inch of rain fell last month in coastal areas of Palm Beach County, according to the South Florida Water Management District. That’s two inches below normal for April.

Rain chances Tuesday stand at about 50 percent, increasing to 70 percent Wednesday.

“The timing for this couldn’t be worse for the Palm Beaches,” Kottlowski said about Wednesday’s storm forecast. “It looks like all the ingredients are coming together during the mid to late afternoon hours.”

 

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Storm Prediction Center forecast for Tuesday.

 

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Near record-high temperatures this week before storms

Tropical breezes will sweep in near-record warm temperatures Wednesday before a cold front crashes through the state with possible thunderstorms, 60 mph wind gusts and spotty drenching rains.

National Weather Service meteorologists are forecasting a high temperature Wednesday of 87 degrees, one degree shy of the record set in 2013 and 10 degrees higher than what’s normal for this time of year.

The warm weather carried by the cyclonic winds of a vigorous low pressure system moving east will give way to cold northwest winds that will plummet Thursday’s daytime high temperature to near 70.

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“While the actual low will stay well to our north, we’ll be influenced by the cold front,” said Arlena Moses, an NWS meteorologist in Miami.

And that means the potential for severe weather similar to what was experienced last week when 5 tornadoes were recorded from Glades County to Miami-Dade County.

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., has far eastern portions of Florida’s Panhandle listed in the “enhanced” category for severe storms on Tuesday. By Wednesday afternoon, as the low pressure system lifts to the northeast, areas in Central Florida south to include parts of northern Palm Beach County are listed as having a marginal risk of severe weather.

 

An advancing cold front is partly to blame for the heat as the warm section of a low pressure system begins to reach the state Wednesday.

Wednesday will start mostly dry over South Florida but become increasingly stormy. Winds will turn southwest with gusts of 25 mph and sustained winds of 15 mph to 20 mph through Thursday morning.

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Forecasters still believe the worst of the weather will stay north of Palm Beach County, but the Treasure Coast and Central Florida were given a “marginal” chance of thunderstorms on Wednesday.

North Florida is listed as having a slight chance of storms by the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla.

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